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Chlorella, an ultra-protein superfood

Chlorella is a unicellular green alga particularly rich in chlorophyll. This algae can be mistaken for spirulina, a blue freshwater algae. Chlorella, this green freshwater algae, has interested science for over a century.

 

Discovered in 1890 by Beyerinck, a Dutch biologist, it was cultivated for the first time shortly afterwards, for experimental purposes, because of its ability to multiply very quickly. Its astonishing nutritional composition led scientists to conduct experiments on various soldiers during the Second World War. Chlorella obtained the title of superfood at the end of the war. For several centuries, this seaweed has been widely consumed by the Japanese for its nutritional virtues.

 

Proteins represent 58% of the seaweed's weight, but it also contains 18 different amino acids, vitamins A, C and E, vitamins from the B complex, a wide variety of minerals, trace elements (iron, sulfur, calcium, zinc, potassium, magnesium, etc.), polyunsaturated fatty acids (including omega 3 fatty acids, which are particularly beneficial for cardiovascular health), as well as carotenoids.

 

Chlorella is a detoxifying algae that combines perfectly with spirulina. Associated, the effects of each multiply. These two foods, very rich in iron, help fight against anemia and detoxify the body.

 

Chlorella acts on hypertension because it has a beneficial effect on blood pressure. This algae has been used for years to relieve patients suffering from fibromyalgia. Chlorella also seems to be able to block the proliferation of cancerous cells in the body. This superfood strengthens the immune system and natural defenses.

 

However, this algae can have side effects on people suffering from asthma, fatigue, hypersensitivity to light or having dermatological problems. It is therefore advisable to seek medical advice before starting a chlorella cure to avoid any risk of contraindication.